Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘onion’ Category

To go with the meatloaf (yes, the recipe and photos will come at some point – I’m just lazy about writing it up) I made what my mother recommended: caramelized shallots.

Ingredients

Ingredients

I’m not really sure about how to give measurements for these ingredients. Because the recipe called for a lot more shallots than I had, so I just eyeballed the rest of the stuff. Also, I think the shallots my mother buys are much smaller than these. So I’ll give her measurements, but feel free to eyeball it a little.

  • 18 shallots (ha! this is a side dish, so 2 per person, plus a couple extras just in case)
  • 1/2 glass of chicken or vegetable stock (I use store bought because I’ve never made it myself – well, I did try to make vegetable stock once, but it ended up being more like vegetable soup)
  • Salt
  • 1 tsp butter
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • 1 glass of Pedro Ximenez, or oporto, or another dessert wine (I decided to use Marsala as I’d just bought it out of curiosity and have never been able to find either of those two in this side of the pond)

Now this can be made with any type of onion. But if you’re going to use normal onions you might want to julienne them instead of using them whole like I did for the shallots. If you are using shallots, peel them trying to keep them as whole as possible.

Shallots

Shallots

These gave enough for 3 or 4 people. Alex and I each had two with the meatloaf that night, and we froze a small container with the rest to have whenever we unfreeze our beef Bourguignonne leftovers. Yes, they freeze well. Or at least my mother says so, and everyone knows mothers are always right.

Onto the fire

Onto the fire

Put everything but the wine and sugar in a saucepan and bring to a boil for about 10 – 15 minutes. Then add the wine and sugar. Mix in and cook uncovered over high heat, moving it frequently.

Keep a close eye on it, because if the sugar starts to burn you’ll have to turn the heat down.

Once most of the liquid is gone, they are ready.

Caramelized shallots

Caramelized shallots

They’re delicious. If you’re cooking them whole like this there will be a really nice contrast between the slight crunchiness of the inside and the sweetness of the outside. If you have julienned them (do it thinly!) they go great with foie gras mi-cuit – specially on thin toast with some other kind of sweet reduction (the aforementioned Pedro Ximenez, or maybe try some raspberry red wine combination).

Advertisements

Read Full Post »